The Mullins Library

Moving makes you realize how many books you have. I’ve been reading comics since about sixth grade. I haven’t kept absolutely everything I’ve ever bought, but I have a lot of it. And most of this stuff is not in print anymore. I keep thinking that I should donate it all to a library or start one of my own. …

Upgrade Soul cover

Comics I Enjoyed in 2019

Alay-Oop, William Gropper NYRB reprinted this book this year, but it was originally published in 1930, the year after Lynd Ward’s God’s Man and the same year as Otto Nuckel’s Destiny and Milt Gross’s He Done Her Wrong. So it comes out of that tradition of one-image-per-page wordless books. Alay-Oop is a love story that begins in a circus, but …

Soma

Soma Frictional Games I like sci-fi horror and the initial videos of Soma looked really cool. But while I was excited to play the game, I was also wary. Frictional games are hit-or-miss with me. I liked Penumbra: Overture and Penumbra: Black Plague had some great moments, but Penumbra: Requiem was a disappointment and Amnesia struck me as overwritten and silly rather than …

Tom Spurgeon, 1968-2019

As with many other folks associated with comics, Tom’s death shocked me and is taking some time for me to process. While I only met Tom once and so wasn’t by any means close with him, he has been a presence in my entire comics career. And it’s been a complicated presence. I created my first mini comic in 1996. …

So yeah, no Inktober

After I sounded so confident, I ended up quitting my Inktober participation. Basically, I realized I was spending what time I had on drawings for Inktober instead of working on my comics. I decided I wanted to put my spare time to the most important task. So here’s the last three Inktober drawings that I did:   But that means …

The Cage Vaughn-James

The Cage by Martin Vaughn-James

Martin Vaughn-James, The Cage; 1975. Like many graphic novels that were published before the term even existed, such as Miné Okubo’s Citizen 13660, Martin Vaughn-James has created a work that is more akin to a picture book than a comic book. By this I mean that neither Okubo nor Vaughn-James uses multiple panels on a page and both set the text separately …